Lectures

Author Programs

The Atlanta History Center offers a variety of lectures throughout the year showcasing award-winning authors who share insight into their latest publication.  Books are available for purchase in the Atlanta History Center Museum Shop during lectures and a book signing follows each Aiken, Elson, and Livingston lecture. View lectures presented at the Margaret Mitchell House, our Midtown campus.
 
Admission for all lectures is $5 for members, $10 for nonmembers, and FREE to AHC Insiders unless otherwise noted. Reservations are required for all lectures. Please call 404.814.4150.  Purchase tickets online or call 404.814.4150. All lecture ticket purchases are non-refundable.
 
If you are an Insiders member ($500 Patron level and above), please email us your reservation request to Insiders@AtlantaHistoryCenter.com or call us at 404.814.4101.

  • Sold Out - Free Program
    Jan 27 2015 - 7:30pm

    Join us for an evening program as Billye Aaron, Sam Massell, and Janice Rothschild Blumberg join Andrew Young for a discussion with veteran journalist and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Hank Klibanoff. These panelists discuss the 1965 dinner honoring Martin Luther King Jr.'s Nobel Peace Prize, Atlanta’s reaction to this event 50 years ago, including divides in the city’s leadership, how leaders ultimately pulled together to create a sold out evening to honor Dr. King, and how the city once again negotiated through controversy to build on its carefully tended image as “The City too Busy to Hate.”

  • Atlanta History Center Lecture
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    Feb 5 2015 - 8:00pm

    Cumbia is a musical form that originated in northern Colombia and then spread throughout Latin America and wherever Latin Americans travel and settle. It has become one of the most popular musical genres in the Americas. Its popularity is largely due to its stylistic flexibility as it absorbs and mixes with the local musical styles it encounters. Known for its appeal to workers, the music takes on different styles and meanings from place to place, and even, as the contributors to this collection show, from person to person.

  • Margaret Mitchell House Lecture
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    Feb 11 2015 - 7:00pm

    Written by Richard Zoglin, this book is both a celebration of an entertainer whose vast contribution has never been properly appreciated, and a complex portrait of a gifted but flawed man, who, unlike many Hollywood stars, truly loved being famous, appreciated its responsibilities, and handled celebrity with extraordinary grace.

  • Margaret Mitchell House Lecture
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    Feb 12 2015 - 7:00pm

    A.J. Fikry, the irascible owner of Island Books, has recently endured some tough years: his wife has died, his bookstore is experiencing the worst sales in its history, and his prized possession – a rare edition of Poe poems – has been stolen. Over time, he has given up on people, and even the books in his store, instead of offering solace, are yet another reminder of a world that is changing too rapidly. Then an unexpected delivery arrives at the bookstore. It’s a small package, but large in impact, and it gives A.J. a second chance at life and love.

  • Margaret Mitchell House Lecture
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    Feb 17 2015 - 7:00pm

    From the acclaimed author of the international best seller Einstein’s Dreams, here is a stunning, lyrical memoir of Memphis from the 1930s through the 1960s that includes the early days of the movies and a powerful grandfather whose ghost remains an ever-present force in the lives of his descendants.
     

  • Atlanta History Center Lecture
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    Feb 18 2015 - 8:00pm

    In 1845, seven years after fleeing bondage in Maryland, Frederick Douglass was in his late twenties and already a celebrated lecturer across the northern United States. The recent publication of his groundbreaking Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave had incited threats to his life, however, and to place himself out of harm's way he embarked on a lecture tour of the British Isles, a journey that would span seventeen months and change him as a man and a leader in the struggle for equality.

  • Margaret Mitchell House Lecture
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    Feb 24 2015 - 7:00pm

    When Julie Crawford leaves Fort Wayne, Indiana for Hollywood, she never imagines she'll cross paths with Carole Lombard, the dazzling actress from Julie's provincial Midwestern hometown. Although the young woman has dreams of becoming a screenwriter, the only job she's able to find is one in the studio publicity department of the notoriously demanding producer David O. Selznick – who is busy burning through directors, writers, and money as he begins filming Gone With the Wind.

  • Margaret Mitchell House Lecture
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    Mar 16 2015 - 7:00pm

    Join the Margaret Mitchell House for the first in a series of free events designed to showcase new voices in fiction. Jamie Kornegay is an independent bookseller and debut novelist, his first book, Soil, is a darkly comic novel about an idealistic young farmer who moves his family to a Mississippi flood basin, suffers financial ruin, and becomes increasingly paranoid he’s being framed for murder.

  • Atlanta History Center Lecture
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    Mar 19 2015 - 8:00pm

    In Journey Into the Wilderness award-winning author Frye Gaillard reflects on the Civil War and the way we remember it, through the lens of letters written by his family members, including great-great grandfather, Thomas Gaillard, and Thomas’s sons, Franklin and Richebourg, both of whom were Confederate officers. As Gaillard explains in his deeply felt introductory essay to the book, he came of age in a Southern generation that viewed the war as a glorious lost cause. But as he read through family letters collected and handed down, he confronted a far more sobering truth.

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