Lectures

Author Programs

The Atlanta History Center offers a variety of lectures throughout the year showcasing award-winning authors who share insight into their latest publication.  Books are available for purchase in the Atlanta History Center Museum Shop during lectures and a book signing follows each Aiken, Elson, and Livingston lecture. View lectures presented at the Margaret Mitchell House, our Midtown campus.
 
Admission for all lectures is $5 for members, $10 for nonmembers, and FREE to AHC Insiders unless otherwise noted. Reservations are required for all lectures. Please call 404.814.4150.  Purchase tickets online or call 404.814.4150. All lecture ticket purchases are non-refundable.
 
If you are an Insiders member ($500 Patron level and above), please email us your reservation request to Insiders@AtlantaHistoryCenter.com or call us at 404.814.4101.

  • Atlanta History Center Lecture
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    Apr 20 2015 - 8:00pm

    In What Comes Next and How to Like It Abigail Thomas wrestles with some of life’s big questions, like whether or not it’s possible to repair a decades old friendship after a major betrayal, how to care for an ailing grown child, how much drinking is too much drinking, and what to do about a beloved dog who eats or hides everything, including TV remotes, shoes (all of them), and a friend’s first edition of Wolf Hall.

  • Atlanta History Center Lecture
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    Apr 22 2015 - 8:00pm

    As the culmination of the Civil War’s sesquicentennial in April 2015 approaches, Cokie Roberts provides a revelatory look at the lives of women during a tumultuous and perennially fascinating era of American history. Concentrating on Washington, D.C., then a small Southern town that sat as a bull’s eye between battling armies, Roberts explores newspaper articles, government records, and private letters and diaries – many never before published – to reconstruct a remarkable period of conflict and change for its self-described belles, for whom life would never be the same.

  • Atlanta History Center Lecture
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    Apr 30 2015 - 8:00pm

    It’s the American dream: get a good education, work hard, buy a house, and achieve prosperity and success. This is the America we believe in – a nation of opportunity, constrained only by ability and effort. But during the last twenty-five years we have seen a disturbing “opportunity gap” emerge. Americans have always believed in equality of opportunity, the idea that all kids, regardless of their family background, should have a decent chance to improve their lot in life. Now, this central tenet of the American dream seems no longer true or at the least, much less true than it was.

  • Atlanta History Center Lecture
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    May 4 2015 - 8:00pm

    Whirlwind is a fast-paced and scrupulously told one-volume history of the American Revolution. Balancing social and political concerns of the period and perspectives of the average American revolutionary with a careful examination of the war itself, Ferling has crafted the ideal book for armchair military history buffs, a book about the causes of the American Revolution, the war that won it, and the meaning of the Revolution overall.

  • Margaret Mitchell House Lecture
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    May 5 2015 - 7:00pm

    In The Dream Lover we meet Aurore Dupin as she is leaving her estranged husband, a loveless marriage, and her family’s estate in the French countryside, to start a new life in Paris. There, she renames herself George Sand and pursues her dream of becoming a writer, embracing an unconventional and even scandalous lifestyle.  

  • Atlanta History Center Lecture
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    May 9 2015 - 2:00pm

    In each of his books, James Bradley has exposed the hidden truths behind America's engagement in Asia. Now comes his most engrossing work yet. Beginning in the 1850s, Bradley introduces us to the prominent Americans who made their fortunes in the China opium trade. As they – good Christians all – profitably addicted millions, American missionaries arrived, promising salvation for those who adopted Western ways.

  • Atlanta History Center Lecture
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    May 12 2015 - 8:00pm

    In today’s culture of achievement, the drive for external success and attention is so fierce there's little time to cultivate inner depth. We're taught to be assertive, to master skills, to broadcast our brand, to get likes, to get followers. We’ve become a self-preoccupied society, and the noise, the fast and shallow communications, makes it hard to hear the quiet voices that steer us beyond our immediate needs. In this elegant interweaving of politics, spirituality, psychology, and confessional, New York Times bestselling author David Brooks’ The Road to Character urges us to confront the meaning of true fulfillment.

  • Margaret Mitchell House Lecture
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    May 19 2015 - 7:00pm

    When fifteen-year-old Maribel Rivera sustains a terrible injury, the Riveras leave behind a comfortable life in Mexico and risk everything to come to the United States so that Maribel can have the care she needs. Once they arrive, it’s not long before Maribel attracts the attention of Mayor Toro, the son of one of their new neighbors, who sees a kindred spirit in this beautiful, damaged outsider. Their love story sets in motion events that will have profound repercussions for everyone involved. Here Henríquez seamlessly interweaves the story of these star-crossed lovers, and of the Rivera and Toro families, with the testimonials of men and women who have come to the United States from all over Latin America.

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